Tagged “relationship”

“I would define rape as having any kind of sexual relationship with someone apart from or against her or his consent.”

Sarah Moon writes here about complementarianism’s ‘ugly relationship with rape.’ She poses two questions of us bad people, and they are as follows — first, how do we define rape? And secondly, what do we propose to do about it?

Okay. I would define rape as having any kind of sexual relationship with someone apart from or against her or his consent. So far, so good, probably, but she then objects to our recognition of the possibility of varying degrees of foolishness on the part of the victim, and she interprets this recognition as somehow meaning ‘when they say they are against rape they don’t mean all rape.’
Douglas Wilson

Regarding a sexual abuse case in Texas

The Dallas Morning News

This story has remarkable similarities to the Jamin Wight sexual abuse case. The preliminary facts, as reported by the news, are as follows: A 24-year-old teacher admitted that she had regular sexual intercourse with a 13-year-old student. She turned herself . . . Continue reading

Friday, June 3, 2016 | 5

A Brief Vindication of Gary Greenfield

Gary Greenfield

Gary Greenfield resigned his household’s membership from the Kirk, telling Doug Wilson directly to his face: “You are a cult leader.” Since then he has learned the hard way that Mr. Wilson does not appreciate such candor. Continue reading

Friday, May 20, 2016 | 5

“it is beyond exasperating to be locked in a rape fantasy with some Caspar Milquetoast”

Male authority is an erotic necessity. In order to make love, a man must be hard and the woman soft. This is not just a physiological detail, but a metaphor for their whole relationship. Feminists, having demanded soft men, have discovered that it is beyond exasperating to be locked in a rape fantasy with some Caspar Milquetoast. Ravish me! she pleads with her eyes. Let’s go down to the aquarium, he says, and look at the endangered species exhibit. If you are going to go for soft, then another woman makes better sense. Lesbianism, it turns out, has an internal logic.
Douglas Wilson

On Hubris

Hubris

“In Greek legal thought, aggression and sexuality came together in the concept of hubris.” Continue reading

Thursday, April 14, 2016 |